A Tachyons CSS Reading List

in Web Design & Development, Tachyons

Dr Manhattan ponders what to read

Last updated on 3 April 2018.

Since its initial release just over three years ago, Tachyons CSS has steadily gaining steam within the web developer/design community. Along with that is a burgeoning community as well as a slew of articles and tutorials about the project. Here I've compiled and annotated a list of top learning resources for Tachyons based on what I've seen in the community and in my own reading.

Note: this list is specifically about Tachyons CSS and does not tackle the theoretical merits/demerits of functional/atomic CSS. For the high-level debate about functional/atomic versus BEM versus Bootstrap, check out John Polacek's The Case for Atomic CSS and Varun Vachhar's Awesome Functional CSS.


For curious on-lookers, doubters & passers-by

The community favorite is currently Simon Vrachliotis' great four-part series, Full re-write in 10 days with tachyons and functional CSS: A case study:

  1. Why re-write in the first place?
  2. What even is functional CSS?
  3. The refactoring process, step by step
  4. The aftermaths: key learnings and recommendations

Another resource that many found helpful is dwyl's Learn Tachyons repo – if you just want a quick, bullet-point overview of why Tachyons + how it works, this is the resource for you.

From a more abstract level, Tachyons co-creator Adam Morse' treatise on CSS and Scalability outlines why Tachyons CSS was created and why many currently-popular practices around CSS scale very poorly.

And if you're up for a raging debate with a stubborn party, check out this Github issue: How is tachyons different from inline styles?


Other notable articles

And if you prefer listening/watching over reading:

Or if tweetstorms are your jam, check out Daniel Eden's Here’s why I think designing systems with tools/frameworks like Tachyons is a Good Ideaβ„’ πŸ˜†


For those experimenting with & using Tachyons


And last but not least, join us on the Tachyons community slack channel if you have further questions, comments or simply want to share some of your work.

Got a resource that was really helpful to you that I'm missing? Let me know in the comments below.


Special thanks to Adam Wathan, Simon Vrachliotis, Varun Vachhar and James Greig for their help with this article.

By Jason Li

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